March 8, 2017 It takes a lot to laugh, it takes a train to cry, Bob Dylan once said. But for California folkie Gwyneth Moreland, it takes a train to send that final, defiant kiss-off to a withering love. Moreland’s song “The California Zephyr,” which appears on her forthcoming album Cider, was inspired by a voyage she took on the train of that same name in 2008, when she was on the eve of a break-up. “It was a real 3000-mile trip, and it was amazing,” Moreland says. “Days and days on a train, stopping off to visit friends — just me and my Discman (yeah, that’s right). What was I listening to in those days? The Carter Family, Hank Williams, Guy Clark, Buck Owens, and Loretta Lynn. I was also discovering new female artists such as Feist, Regina Spektor, and Nellie McKay. I also knew a breakup was bound to happen with my then-boyfriend when I got back home to Mendocino, California. I had some very basic guitar skills at that point, but I was beginning to learn how simple melody and lyrics could get across complicated emotions. The song “The California Zephyr” is now a favorite of mine to play. It’s always fun to watch toes tapping along. I think a good song should be like a train. You should be able to easily hop up, sit down and take the journey.” Below, watch the video for “The California Zephyr, which was filmed by Bay Area photographer Jay Blakesberg. Cider drops April 21 via Blue Rose Music. Link: https://americansongwriter.com/2017/03/song-premiere-gwyneth-moreland/?mid=272

March 8, 2017

It takes a lot to laugh, it takes a train to cry, Bob Dylan once said.

But for California folkie Gwyneth Moreland, it takes a train to send that final, defiant kiss-off to a withering love.

Moreland’s song “The California Zephyr,” which appears on her forthcoming album Cider, was inspired by a voyage she took on the train of that same name in 2008, when she was on the eve of a break-up.

“It was a real 3000-mile trip, and it was amazing,” Moreland says. “Days and days on a train, stopping off to visit friends — just me and my Discman (yeah, that’s right). What was I listening to in those days? The Carter Family, Hank Williams, Guy Clark, Buck Owens, and Loretta Lynn. I was also discovering new female artists such as Feist, Regina Spektor, and Nellie McKay. I also knew a breakup was bound to happen with my then-boyfriend when I got back home to Mendocino, California.

I had some very basic guitar skills at that point, but I was beginning to learn how simple melody and lyrics could get across complicated emotions. The song “The California Zephyr” is now a favorite of mine to play. It’s always fun to watch toes tapping along. I think a good song should be like a train. You should be able to easily hop up, sit down and take the journey.”

Below, watch the video for “The California Zephyr, which was filmed by Bay Area photographer Jay Blakesberg. Cider drops April 21 via Blue Rose Music.

Link: https://americansongwriter.com/2017/03/song-premiere-gwyneth-moreland/?mid=272

February 27, 2017 Read more here.  When it came time to begin working on her new album, Gwyneth Moreland turned to her own backyard for inspiration. It was the rugged and beautiful landscape of her Northern California hometown of Mendocino, a place that has long embraced artists. She also turned to the music she grew up listening to – artists like  Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Billie Holiday, and contemporary folkies like Gillian Welch. The result is her new LP Cider, which comes out March 10th on Blue Rose Music. With her expressive vocals and reflective lyrics, Moreland balances traditional folk and Americana, and even incorporates jazz influences on occasion. The songs on Cider feel intimate and personal yet they resonate on a more universal emotional level. Today Glide Magazine is presenting a premiere of one of the standout songs on Cider, “Broken Road”. Inspired by Moreland’s native landscape, the song feels like a leisurely walk through the California sunshine, conveying a sense of peace with rich harmonies and acoustic guitar playing. Moreland offers her own story behind the song: “At first glance, one might guess that the term ‘Broken Road’ would be an artsy way to describe the symbolic bumpy path of life. But this song, written primarily by my husband Skyler, is about an actual road, a pothole-riddled mud slick that wound through backwoods junkyards and spilled into the dense undergrowth of Jackson State Forest. This was the path of the day, winding its way to a rural bus stop every morning in the dark or leading him home from his first job shoveling slop and manure at a farm owned by a miniature cattle breeder. When Skyler first wrote this song with a more rock ‘n’ roll style melody, he called it ‘Snake of Light.’ The imagery was so clear to me. It did indeed tell his story, but the muddy, rutted-out roads that carve through the misty trees here in Mendocino County were my childhood stomping grounds as well. At an early age, I too learned how to navigate through the brambly forest. My sister and I set out on many adventures to find the best river spots and hidden waterfalls that lay beyond the yellow forestry gates. When I put these words to my own melody and helped to craft the chorus, I wanted to create a guitar part that embodied that feeling of carefully placing one soggy foot in front of the other while gazing out ahead into the fog. The only thing that guides you there is the snake of light — the moonlight and starlight that cuts through from above, past the carved-out tree line as it follows the twisting road.” 

February 27, 2017
Read more here

When it came time to begin working on her new album, Gwyneth Moreland turned to her own backyard for inspiration. It was the rugged and beautiful landscape of her Northern California hometown of Mendocino, a place that has long embraced artists. She also turned to the music she grew up listening to – artists like  Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Billie Holiday, and contemporary folkies like Gillian Welch. The result is her new LP Cider, which comes out March 10th on Blue Rose Music.

With her expressive vocals and reflective lyrics, Moreland balances traditional folk and Americana, and even incorporates jazz influences on occasion. The songs on Cider feel intimate and personal yet they resonate on a more universal emotional level. Today Glide Magazine is presenting a premiere of one of the standout songs on Cider, “Broken Road”. Inspired by Moreland’s native landscape, the song feels like a leisurely walk through the California sunshine, conveying a sense of peace with rich harmonies and acoustic guitar playing.

Moreland offers her own story behind the song:
“At first glance, one might guess that the term ‘Broken Road’ would be an artsy way to describe the symbolic bumpy path of life. But this song, written primarily by my husband Skyler, is about an actual road, a pothole-riddled mud slick that wound through backwoods junkyards and spilled into the dense undergrowth of Jackson State Forest. This was the path of the day, winding its way to a rural bus stop every morning in the dark or leading him home from his first job shoveling slop and manure at a farm owned by a miniature cattle breeder.

When Skyler first wrote this song with a more rock ‘n’ roll style melody, he called it ‘Snake of Light.’ The imagery was so clear to me. It did indeed tell his story, but the muddy, rutted-out roads that carve through the misty trees here in Mendocino County were my childhood stomping grounds as well. At an early age, I too learned how to navigate through the brambly forest. My sister and I set out on many adventures to find the best river spots and hidden waterfalls that lay beyond the yellow forestry gates.

When I put these words to my own melody and helped to craft the chorus, I wanted to create a guitar part that embodied that feeling of carefully placing one soggy foot in front of the other while gazing out ahead into the fog. The only thing that guides you there is the snake of light — the moonlight and starlight that cuts through from above, past the carved-out tree line as it follows the twisting road.” 

Artist: Gwyneth Moreland Hometown: Mendocino, CA Song: "The California Zephyr" Album: Cider Release Date: April 21, 2017 Label: Blue Rose Music In Their Words: "In 2008, I booked a 3,000-mile trip by bus and train from my hometown of Mendocino, California, through the Southwest. With a heavy heart, I began a journey of long rides on the Pacific Surfliner and Southwest Chief, with a return ride from Denver on the famous train, the California Zephyr. During this time, I began to realize that my relationship with my then-boyfriend/bandmate was dissolving. So, yeah: I was heartbroken, torn up, and in desperate need of an adventure. So, when inspiration from the Carter Family's “The Cannon Ball Blues” struck while aboard the California Zephyr, I went with it. What came out was not a biographical song, but one that was definitely shaped by the way my heart was feeling and all the tunes floating through my head on that 54-hour ride from Denver. A friend nailed it when he said, 'You are singing about leaving behind your honey babe, but you've got a huge smile on your face!' And yes, it's true -- I do ... now. All those years of searching have led me here to this moment. The train keeps rolling." -- Gwyneth Moreland Link: http://www.thebluegrasssituation.com/read/listen-gwyneth-moreland-california-zephyr

Artist: Gwyneth Moreland
Hometown: Mendocino, CA
Song: "The California Zephyr"
Album: Cider
Release Date: April 21, 2017
Label: Blue Rose Music

In Their Words: "In 2008, I booked a 3,000-mile trip by bus and train from my hometown of Mendocino, California, through the Southwest. With a heavy heart, I began a journey of long rides on the Pacific Surfliner and Southwest Chief, with a return ride from Denver on the famous train, the California Zephyr. During this time, I began to realize that my relationship with my then-boyfriend/bandmate was dissolving. So, yeah: I was heartbroken, torn up, and in desperate need of an adventure.

So, when inspiration from the Carter Family's “The Cannon Ball Blues” struck while aboard the California Zephyr, I went with it. What came out was not a biographical song, but one that was definitely shaped by the way my heart was feeling and all the tunes floating through my head on that 54-hour ride from Denver. A friend nailed it when he said, 'You are singing about leaving behind your honey babe, but you've got a huge smile on your face!' And yes, it's true -- I do ... now. All those years of searching have led me here to this moment. The train keeps rolling." -- Gwyneth Moreland
Link: http://www.thebluegrasssituation.com/read/listen-gwyneth-moreland-california-zephyr

What they're saying about the music....

"As its title suggests, Gwyneth Moreland's new album Cider is sweet, tangy and potent. One of the most beautiful voices and talented songwriters I've encountered as a programmer, Gwyneth has packed this album with power, truth and joy. I can't wait to share this with my audience - Gwyneth's music just takes my breath away!" 
- Kate Hayes, KOZT, Fort Bragg, CA

"Gwyneth’s songs have a strength showing both sense of place and an ability to tell a story. Her voice has a power which brings her songs to life and makes her a compelling performer.” 
—  Bill Wagman, KDVS/ Davis, CA

“Blessed with a great voice, terrific songwriting ability and an extremely pleasant way of presenting a song, Gwyneth’s new release is sure to please.” 
—  Bill Bowker, KRSH/Santa Rosa, CA

Beautifully stark and chilly, captured into 2 mics, paired to the bones it’s the better for it, wonderful rootsy tunes, complimented by the background noise of breezes, birds – you feel like you’re peering into the mechanics of the creation process.
- Rudie Humphries, Americana UK
full article


"The result is a singer/songwriter LP with the warmth and intimacy of a small house show." 
- Brice Ezell, PopMatters
full article
 

"Boldly eschewing the unnecessary and the superfluous to strip things back to the essence of genuinely intimate songwriting means she has created a record of stunning simplicity and feeling, which is undeniably moving and affecting." 
- The Mad Mackerel
full article
 

“'Pine Box Sailor', a beautifully simple folk tune that’s calm and relaxing. Her music tells a familiar story but does so in a subtle and entertaining fashion." 
- Magnet Magazine
full article
 

Her music is bare but emotionally present, as if her songs were captured spontaneously as she played on her front porch in the last few hours of a spring evening. Running through strands of Americana and early folk music, she finds a beauty and emotional restlessness in unadorned words and sounds. 
—Joshua Pickard - Nooga.com
full article
 

"What strikes me about Gwyneth’s music is the breadth of styles, and the refreshing straightforwardness of her writing. She speaks her mind in her poetry, and is not afraid to set up a musical expectation that shifts gears in unexpected ways. She evokes the lurch of the tavern and the comfort of home with a playful and poignant lyricism wrapped in clear musical arrangements."
—David Remedios - Sound Designer and Composer, Boston MA
 
 

"Moreland’s voice on this album is so authentic to the genre that we initially thought we were listening to something remastered from the 70s and not a new release." 
- Matthew Harrison, RadioInfo.com
full article

"We knew there was something special when we saw Gwyneth Moreland in concert with David Hayes last December... sold out show, huge applause, standing ovations and even an occasional scream. Now, just a year later, Gwyneth & David have somehow managed to bottle that magic with Ceilings, Floors, And Open Doors... intimate, musical and as open to the world as the studio they recorded in."
—Tom Yates - KOZT


"Recorded under the sparest of conditions -- apparently just two microphones and an open door -- Gwyneth Moreland's "Little Black Flies" finds the Northern Californian in a timeless, contemplative folk mood that lingers long after the small but lovely song is through." 
- KDHX
full article


"We are really looking forward to hearing the rest of this album." 
- Katie Sevigny - Lady Indie

"Maybe roots music, in the context of Americana, has become an increasingly popular genre over the last 10 years because it has the ability to span across blues, country and rock-and-roll. And so someone who plays a little blues can also say they're "Americana" if they put a little twang into it. But there's not many who combine all the elements as fluently as Gwyneth Moreland.”
—Monica Stark - The Ukiah Daily Journal


"From out of the Northern California redwoods on the beautiful Mendocino Coast comes a talent so unique, it makes me want to shout it from the hilltops to the world-wide airwaves."
—DJ Larry Hacken - KZYX